Posts filed under ‘Management skills’

The Job of Every Leader is Coach

Jack Welch’s book, Winning, was hailed as the best management book ever. It is still thought provoking, even if his own legacy has been questioned.

One thing he says about leadership is that it is defined by coaching. Every interaction should  coach and build self confidence. Coaching is critiquing and guiding. Self confidence is built by pouring out encouragement, caring and recognition. So employees have to have opportunity to fail and not get canned for it. Indeed, he blew up a warehouse!  Wow! How different from my observations, where  doing what was agreed upon was negatively rewarded!

He says it is a rare boss who can get results without being a people person. He says we don’t celebrate enough — and not with company parties but with ticked for the families to Disney land!

Of course, none of this can happen without factual evaluation, without candor, and without a culture of differentiation.  With this, though, real trust and great results can be built.

Coaching that builds confidence. Thought provoking.

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July 3, 2017 at 1:46 pm Leave a comment

Time to Prepare for Job Performance Reviews – Help Here

As Andy Williams crooned, “It’s the most wonderful time of the year.” No, I’m not talking about Christmas. I’m talking about March Madness! I’m a big fan of college basketball and the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament is like Christmas in March. There are always underdogs upsetting the established favorites and feel-good stories of players overcoming […]

via This Coach Tells You What All Great Leaders Know — Blanchard LeaderChat

Most of the managers and directors I talk to hate performance reviews with a passion. However, they are the number one tool to make your staff into the team you want them to be. I have recorded training for directors loaded right now. Get training there. Or call me and we can have a consult. Clock hours for Directors in Texas. Con ed credit for some other professionals. Call now: 512-249-7629.

March 30, 2017 at 9:10 pm Leave a comment

Coaching to Support Learning: 3 Best Practices

In Education, we often forget the importance of training — and implementation. Nothing can be more important to the lead educator than being the lead learner and the cheerleader for the coach she/he has brought in to train the staff.

Blanchard LeaderChat

CoachCoaching to support learning is a process that gives learners a chance, after training, to go back to their jobs and practice using the concepts they just learned. Providing employees with two or three 1-hour coaching sessions creates an actual learning process instead of just a training event.

This extra step is important in today’s busy work environment. Many organizations don’t have the resources to provide managers the time to grow and develop their people. And employees often don’t have enough room in their schedules to practice training concepts when they get back to work.

Done right, coaching to support learning sends employees a clear-cut message: Your leaders believe training is important—and we want to provide you with the support you need to be able to apply your new learnings back on the job.

Here are three best practices to provide coaching that supports learning in a way that works.

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January 13, 2017 at 1:38 pm Leave a comment

One Best Thing to do to Reduce Employee Turnover! Surprising!

Lots of my clients got in a management position because they loved what they were doing: teaching children, making furniture, preaching — not because they wanted to read management books. Now, they are, however, managers. One of the biggest challenges is to keep good employees. Wouldn’t you like to know how to do that? How to reduce turnover? How to make good employees great? How to avoid having to start all over again with a new employee — that great gamble? And the answer is — based on both scientific study and experience and taught by the most famous management guru – drum roll — is staff meetings.

WHAT? Right. Ken Blanchard recommends two staff meetings a week. In these staff meetings, you let your employees know what you want. You find out what problems they are having. You let them feel like a team. You avoid conflict. You also train them. Good meetings are often overlooked tool in managing people. Bad meetings are bad. Good meetings work. I can help. I train managers (pastors, owners and whoever runs meetings) how to do better meetings. I can also be part of the training of your staff. Plan your meetings now.   Oh, an anyone who engages me during January 2017, will receive a 20% discount. Have a great year.

January 5, 2017 at 9:57 pm Leave a comment

Most People Hire Wrong.

Top advice for making good hires is the most overlooked; indeed, it is usually instituted exactly opposite to optimal. Check out Jack Welch’s advice and compare to your own observations.

In my quest to bring you the best management advice, I’ve been reporting on great books. I’ve been chewing on Jack Welch’s Winning. What first attracted me was the squib on the cover, quoting Warren Buffet, the best investor in the world, saying “No other management book will ever be needed.” Wow. Jack Welch was CEO to GE during its pinnacle of success.

I was blown away by his tips on hiring. His tips are for finding and nurturing winners. The margins of my book is now marked with exclamation points. I agree with all of his observations, but where I have been an employee, never ever have I seen any of this put into place, but rather the reverse. Where I have worked (government, non-profit) these principles are instituted in the opposite. No wonder those institutions are not doing well! I think I have clients, too, who fall prey to some of this. But you, dear readers now have a special “in.”

Here is what Welch says, summarized. At the end of the post, I will put a link for the book. I do recommend you get it, read it, mark, and inwardly digest it. Then call me to talk about it. I do have a recorded training session on how to hire, complete with clock hours for educators in Texas. . That is a beginning. Welch’s advice is more theoretical and so will take you even farther. If you have employee problems, call me and let me help you institute these  principles.

Nothing matter more than getting the right people on the field. (I would say, also put the right people in the right position on the team. If you have a whole team like this, you win. )

First: Look for integrity, intelligence, and maturity. (Most people look for people they think will be easy to control or someone they like – in that moment.)

Then EEEEP:

Energy: Then look for positive energy – meaning thrive on action and relish change. (This is tough, because HR people tend to despise change and so do poorly run organizations.)

Energize: Ability to energize others. (Which a smart person will put down so you will like them.)

Edge: courage to make tough yes-or-no decisions. Decisiveness. (Poor managers want to send people like this away, because they are scared that their opinions will clash.)

Execute: Ability to get the job done. Results. (But look at integrity first. Then don’t be scared to hire someone brighter than you.)

Passion : authentic excitement about work. – accuatlly they tend to be passionate about everything they do. (I have been so very much and oten taught to stuff this, to be less intense, so as not to scare people. So don’t be frigthened by a competent person and find a way to allow a passionate person to admit it to you.)

Hiring for the top

Find people who are authentic. Authenticity makes people likeable. (Amazing – and I see the exact reverse! Even in some of the most famous, if broke, corporations in this town. Oh, I bet there is a connection. Back to integrity.)

Ability to see around the corners. (Again, while this may be highly valued in a competent large corp, this stuff scares people in smaller, less competent organizations. Get over it, so you can be bigger and more compentent of an organizations.)

Strong penchant to surround themselves with people better and smarter than they are. Ah yes, grasshopper, be these things, as well as hire the people who have these things.

<a href="http://Winning” target=”_blank”>The Book: Winning by Jack Welch

May 9, 2016 at 2:22 pm Leave a comment

Definite Techniques for Transformation

Triggers,  by Marshall Goldsmith and Mark Reiter       NY: Random, 2015

Okay, folks, we are talking about psychology and behavior here, not guns. This book begins sounding very psychologically oriented, but it was written by a management consultant, often brought in by top executives to “smooth the interpersonal rough edges off” by a CEO. Aims at helping implement desired changes.

Questions are clearly Goldsmith’s preferred methods. One chart tracks kinds of questions, whether they are more helpful or not by whether they are wanted or not and encouraging or not. Another asks whether you should preserve or eliminate, be creative or accepting. Drawn as a circle, one can plot items on a continuum.

The insight about how much environment affects a person, coupled with the questions allows people to move off their usual excuses of blaming the environment and see themselves and give themselves motivation for change.

Goldsmith reflected on his coaching failures to ask how committed to change people were. Some don not want to be changed and it is arrogant of us to think we can help them change. In other cases, people need help and structure. For instance, the 5 point checklist for doctors in intensive care units dramatically educed infections – even thought doctors know all the the ingredients. The structure of the checklist reminded them to do what they knew to do. Similarly, we know crises will occur and other challenges will come, so we need help (such as someone calling us to ask us the questions or daily rating system) or structure (such as regular check in meetings)

On the recurrent obstacles is that we get tired at the end of the day, and sometimes we have too much on our plate. Other times, we just didn’t plan to do our best, as if there were some times when it would be okay to be an amateur. Well, sometimes it is: when it is impossible to be anything else, then it is time to settle for good enough rather than be unhappy. Most of the time in interpersonal relationships, however, we could be better, if we realized there were a way. Not enough sleep

Finally he asks about when is good enough good enough. Manufacturing will have certain errors and effort to eliminate them at a certain point become counter-productive, but by contrast, a CEO must not let himself off the hook by saying he is not a professional speaker and a husband can’t avoid responsibility by saying well, at work he has to be professional.

Helpful in changing behavior and helping in cuing a coach on how to help clients.

What questions have meant the most in changing your own behavior? What questions have you posed to your staff to improve performance?

April 18, 2016 at 1:00 am Leave a comment

On Becoming a Leader

Warren Bennis On Becomng a Leader Addison-Wesley 1989

A classic. With experience on both the academic and practical side, Bennis covers the how of becoming a leader. The key to full self-expression is understanding oneself and the world and the key to understanding is learning – from one’s own life experience. It is more important then, to set out to express oneself, one’s mission, rather than to prove that one is a leader. The latter will make one driven, the former will make one successful.
So far I think this is all good news. He says that leaders are made and not merely board, which is good news. Discovered that leaders are self-expressive people. This is also good news, in my mind. Once you are formed correctly, then you can deploy yourself, so good management is authentic and comfortable.

However, there is some further surprising news for organizations. It is NOT true that the people with the right stuff naturally rise to the top. In fact, those with more promise have a harder time, because organizations favor those who have a more docile character, and so when they rise to the top, they are often not ready to be leaders. Since Bennis’ book, there has been more on constraint theory. Since we also have some data on our vast under-supply of creative leadership, this is a real challenge to our society. How are we keeping leaders down?

Further, he said that it is not what you don’t know that hurts you, but what you know that isn’t so.

So here are Bennis’ questions that we might adopt for our own, to spark a discussion.
What do you believe are the primary qualities of leadership?
What role did failure play in your life?
How did you learn?
What can organizational do to stifle or encourage leadership?

My star thought: most people SUCCUMB to just going along, and the outside environment approves, but this is the opposite of leadership. Leadership is being and then inspiring people to do the right, helpful, courageous thing. So how can you do that?

<a href="http://On Becoming a Leader” target=”_blank”>Available at Amazon – tho I don’t get anything for telling you. Just trying to make things easier for you.

March 15, 2016 at 12:03 pm Leave a comment

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